A New Hampshire Alimony Primer

I am always surprised when a potential client comes in to meet with me and says “there’s no such thing as alimony in New Hampshire, right?” Be assured, there is alimony in New Hampshire. 

Alimony is governed by RSA 458:19. The law says that the recipient must have the need for alimony, and the payor must have the ability to pay. The alimony award must take into account the lifestyle of the parties during the marriage. In determining the amount of alimony, the court must consider the length of the marriage; the age, health, social or economic status, occupation, amount and sources of income, the property awarded to either party, vocational skills, employability, estate, liabilities, and needs of each of the parties; the opportunity of each for future acquisition of capital assets and income; the fault of either party as defined in RSA 458:16-a, II(l); and the federal tax consequences of the order.

Things to know about alimony:

  • Alimony is gender neutral. Men and women can receive alimony.
  • The court has broad discretion when awarding alimony, and there is no formula in New Hampshire for either an amount or a term.
  • Alimony cannot be waived in a divorce stipulation. The law provides either spouse with the right to petition for alimony within 5 years of the date of the divorce decree, or if alimony has been ordered for a definite time period, within 5 years from the date of the last payment.
  • Alimony is tax deductible to the payor, and is taxable income to the recipient.
  • The primary purpose of alimony is rehabilitative, meaning the support is intended to allow the recipient time to become self-supporting. However, the court has the authority to order alimony for an indefinite period of time where appropriate.
  • Agreements that contain a provision for the payment of alimony often include language about the terminating alimony upon the recipient’s remarriage or cohabitation with a romantic partner.