I had a conversation today in which the person stated that most Guardian ad Litem’s are volunteers, and that it is very unusual to have a GAL who is paid for his services. I thought this topic was worth a blog post to clear up this misconception that seems to derive from the common mix up between a CASA and a GAL.

As discussed previously on this blog, a GAL is a professional appointed by the court to perform an independent investigation and to make recommendations to the court regarding the best interests of a child. A GAL may be appointed in all types of family law cases, from divorces to guardianships, and is paid for her services. GALs are not volunteers, although most GALs work for drastically reduced rates and work far more hours on a case than are billed.

On the other hand, a Court Appointed Special Advocate or CASA is a trained volunteer who serves as an advocate for children in abuse or neglect cases. An abuse or neglect case is a type of case brought to the court by the Division of Children, Youth and Families under the Child Protection Act to protect the health, safety and welfare of a child. Although a CASA’s role is very similar to that of a GAL, a CASA only works on abuse or neglect cases or derivative termination of parental rights.

  • Alicia Delp

    I think it needs to be noted that the terms differ from state to state. In some states, the CASA volunteers are called Guardian Ad Litems. This is the case in North Carolina and Florida and a handful of other states. The GALs there fill the same volunteer role that the CASA volunteers in other states do, only the name is different (even the volunteer training materials are the same). So, in some states, the term Guardian Ad Litem, does indeed refer to volunteers.